The Universal 2.0

$28.99

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What do you do when you need a binder bag that can carry EVERYTHING you need for a 21st-century classroom or office? You get the Universal 2.0 by Case-It, an amazingly durable and versatile zipper binder that makes it easy to organize and carry all the essentials you need for your day – all with an innovative, fun sense of style too! This unique zipper binder with two main compartments. You get a strong 3-ring binder that makes it easy to store otherwise loose sheets of paper and quickly flip through them without worrying about tearing the punched holes. There’s enough room to hold up to 400 pages! There are also 2 inside pockets to keep additional items secured and organized. In addition, on the exterior, you get a padded, DETACHABLE protective pocket to hold a small laptop and/or tablet (up to 13 inches).

With Universal 2.0 you’ve got just what you need to easily store everything you’ll want to take with you every day, matching your on-the-move lifestyle. For example, a selection of the different items you could carry at different times includes a thin textbook, multiple notebooks, a sketch pad, pens and pencils, all your notes, your small laptop /tablet, your smartphone, charging cables, a few snacks, and even your wallet all stored inside the Universal. Though there are limitations, you can carry a variety of items at once inside this zipper binder. Case-It is committed to providing high-quality, long-lasting organizational products that stand up to the rigors of modern life, all in a way that is fun and culturally connected – and the Universal meets such high standards of excellence. Constructed for durability, the Universal is also easy to carry with either a handle or shoulder strap as you go throughout your day. Ideal for work, school, or travel, the Universal will help you stay organized and move around efficiently

Weight 1.98 oz
Dimensions 4.331 × 11.881 × 13.11 in
Color

Black, Blue, Purple, Red

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